Bohemia Interactive Simulations VR VBS3 live demo

Bohemia Interactive Simulations has again shown VR interaction with their VBS3 product at I/ITSEC 2016 in Orlando, Florida.

Sharing earlier development with engines that power the ArmA3 and DayZ video-games, VBS3 is a complex defense-industry training simulator product.

Bohemia Interactive Simulations VR with Oculus Rift

The multi-station Combined Arms demonstration included four Oculus Rift based stations. A two place F/A 18 crew and a driver/gunner Stryker vehicle crew.

Leap Motion cameras supplemented the Oculus HMDs. The F/A18 crew directly input data on the virtual aircraft’s cockpit MFDs with their fingers as one would in reality.

Earlier videos demonstrated tracked hands using the Leap Motion in VBS3.

The whole multi-station networked demo is run in real-time. It shows that BISim has huge confidence in their product and the VR integration appeared faultless.

VR Motion Platforms

Also of note in the Bohemia Interactive Simulations VR demo is Talon Simulations‘ Atomic A3 Motion Simulators. The F/A18 Pilot and the Stryker driver each sat in seats mounted on a A3 compact motion platform. The platforms receive simulation data from VBS3/VBS Blue to cue motion. The accelerations of the platform cue the human balance system to perceive in-environment physical movements.

The Oculus tracking camera is mounted on the moving part of the seat. This ensures the users head is tracked relative to the seat regardless of the orientation of the chair. The Leap Motion cameras similarly track relative to the Oculus HMD.

I’ve not had the opportunity to try VR combined with a motion platform. I’d imagine it helps with matching up the vestibular system with the visual cues from the HMD. This should allow for greater VR comfort as well as the obvious realism/immersion boost.

It’s also interesting to see practical combination of immersive VR users with simple desktop display users in the same environment.

This could allow highly immersive training for the students in the VR environment. Tutors can then perform the role of other units on the simple desktop stations. This is much like the established training method used in fixed-base and motion platform aircraft simulators for pilot training.

 

 

Hello Virtual World

Every blog has its first post and it is often the least read so well done if you found this one. This is a first post with a difference though; i’m writing it from within a virtual environment. Specifically, I’m using a HTC Vive system with SteamVR’s virtual keyboard and built-in VR web browser.

Learning to type in VR

It’s a bit like typing on a smartphone, the Vive controller’s ‘laser’ acting as a long virtual finger or stylus. I have to admit it has some limitations.

Typing in VR with SteamVR's virtual keyboard with the Vive remote
Typing on SteamVR’s virtual keyboard with the Vive remote ‘laser’ wand.

Continue reading “Hello Virtual World”